Road Rules – Why You Should Always Wave


I ride motorcycles and I drive a Jeep. That means I wave at just about every vehicle I pass on the road. Waving and riding have always gone together for me, the camaraderie of the road and riding two wheels just fit. 

That made the Jeep wave transition easy – but I find that in both areas people wave back less and less. (These aren’t the only two vehicles that enjoy a wave between like minded people but they are what I drive.) There was a time that I got mad, thought they were rude, and tragically fell into that all too human trap of thinking negatively about that other person.


What I have come to realize with age, understanding, and wisdom is they might just not know or understand the wave. In the case of Jeeps and bikes maybe they don’t realize it began as a way veterans greeted each other with their surplus Army Jeeps and motorcycles flying their club colors. Maybe they are thinking of other things and while they didn’t wave back – they appreciated the wave. Maybe that wave made them smile and they waved at the next person.


People are more connected than ever. I can message across the world, video chat anywhere, post pictures, videos, and “talk” to my followers on social media anytime day or night. What I can’t always do is be present in the moment. That small gesture between people is an understanding of the passion, the lunacy, and the enjoyment that is driving the vehicles we choose.

Don’t wave expecting it to be returned, wave to show you get it. Wave because you want to connect, wave because that other person could use the wave to brighten an otherwise lonely day. Wave because you mean it. I know if I see you I’ll wave your way. It may be a peace sign, drop it low, or even just a finger lift but I will acknowledge you on the road. If I happen to not wave and you did. Know I appreciate it and I’ll pass it on to the next person.


William Connor

As the Editor, William is responsible for all the good, the bad, the ugly and the indifferent that happens at 4WAAM. William brings a wide range of experience to this role having been a cook, a painter, a machinist, part time mechanic, computer programmer, and writer. He also wields a freely shared opinion on just about everything., just ask him.